Snapshot: December 31st, 2011

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On the final day of 2011, we take a quick peek at who's visiting StoryRhyme.com...

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StoryRhyme After Dark: A Second Life

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"The dolls lay in a disorganized heap in the dirty window of the thrift shop. They stared out at the pushcarts lining the snowy street outside. They didn’t know what to make of it.

"They had never been in a place like this before…"

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StoryRhyme After Dark: Night of the Monster

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The Professor picked up the small bottle at the end of the bench and looked at the brain inside. “It’s a very small brain, Igor...”

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StoryRhyme After Dark: The Gargoyle and the Scullery Maid

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“Why, what’s so special about the Schatsky’s?”

“Sheila Schatsky is President of the Ladies-in-waiting Society that’s all. You want to get ahead, don’t you––you have to play nice with the Schatsky’s... What are you doing with that telephone book?”

“I have to call a plumber. Half the gargoyles on this side of the cathedral belfry are plugged up... Why do we have to go to the Schatsky’s anyway? Why can’t we stay home once in a while?”

“We have to keep up, Boris. I don’t want to have to polish candlesticks all my life...”

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StoryRhyme After Dark: The Portrait of John Blank

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"Marcel Comeau is a superb portrait painter. He has the rare ability to capture the most fleeting of expressions, the subtlest of smiles and the evanescent qualities that reveal a man’s personality.

"He is painting a portrait of Mr. John Blank. Mr. Blank is president of a company that manufactures kitchen appliances that no one thinks of buying..."

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StoryRhyme After Dark: The Vacation


"George is hard to convince, especially with the relentless reasoning of his wife Mildred. From a lifetime of looking in one direction he is very reluctant to change his point of view. Mildred, on the other hand, looks at all sides of every situation -- so many sides in fact, that she rarely reaches a conclusion. The most minor and basic decisions are delicately viewed from all angles.

"Their daughter, Angela, (and what an inappropriate name for the black-hearted wench she has turned out to be) is of marriageable age and is searching for the path of least resistance -- particularly where men are concerned..."

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Transition's Eve, or, Sappy Me...

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Today, on the eve of what is another transition for our boy -- who now stands taller than I and whose feet are two and a half sizes larger than Husband's..? ..! -- I wax philosophical once more.

Here are some random thoughts from a mother whose son is about to be promoted from the eighth grade. I will try not to be too sappy, but no guarantees there...

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StoryRhyme After Dark: House of Cards

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"A little revolutionary?" -- Harry

"In many ways it was idyllic. There were no good times and no bad times; except for the weather, everything was the same, from one day to the next...

"Pickpockets and Poets slipped through the net just as effortlessly as they have in every civilization -- the two P’s, like mumps and measles were ever present visitors at the back door..."

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StoryRhyme After Dark: The Wedding Cake Couple

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"Before it falls, they will be removed and put on a shelf in the kitchen of Paradise Caterers until the next wedding reception. That may be tomorrow or the day after... Or who knows? There may not be another one for a very, very long time..."

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StoryRhyme After Dark: Occam's Razor


"Pluralitas non est ponenda sine neccesitate" -- Friar William of Ockham

“Times were tough. Shorty's father wasn't working and mine was on half time. We knew we'd never get the money from home, and even if we raised prices on the work we did in the neighborhood we'd never get near $149.50. I carried old one legged lady Schroeder's bundles from the grocer for her once a week. She'd give me a quarter, and I didn't see how I could tell her the price was now fifty cents. Deposit bottles were a nickel and newspapers were ten cents for a hundred pounds; those were the facts of life; we couldn't change them...”

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